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Well-Stacked: 5 Designers Make Objects Fun Again with Playful Takes on the "Totem"


Stacked from floor to ceiling or scaled down for table display, the totemic design products by today's group of emerging talent continues the tradition that Milan-based architect Ettore Sottsass began with the famous Memphis design group in the '80s, which made cold, machine-age products friendly, lively, and even sexy (for more on this, see the video below).

Here, five up-and-comers translate those ideals with bright colors and bold geometries to create childlike riffs on the totem pole.

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Totem Lights, Jamie Julien-Brown for Darkroom
For this collaboration, the artist and designer Jamie Julien-Brown stacks vintage and unusual glass and ceramic lampshades high on a ceramic tile base. Each Totem Light is unique, varying in size, color, and character.

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Magneto Tableware and Coffee Table, Patrick Laing
Hand-turned beechwood tableware stacks neatly to create varying sculptural forms that delight the eyes—and the tastebuds. Magnets secure any combination of bowls, plates, cups, candelabras, tea lights, and and even an egg cup to create a specially designed coffee table.

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Element Vessel, Vitamin Design

Mix and match your choice of shapes and materials—marble, wood, glass, rose gold, polished steel, plastic and cork—to design your own vessel. Top off your bespoke configuration (limited to an edition of ten) with a glass neck and cork stopper for a completely unique conversation starter (pictured at very top and above).

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Shrines Cabinet, Dean Brown for Goodd
Described as micro-furniture for display, you can think of Dean Brown's Shrines for Scottish design brand Goodd as oak curio cabinets for the modern man. Each unit includes bespoke blown glassware and hand-painted patterns.

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Identity Parade, Adam Nathaniel Furman for London Design Museum
As part of this year's Designers in Residence program at the London Design Museum, Adam Nathaniel Furman responded to the prompt, "How can design reflect a sense of identity?" by constructing 3D-printed ceramic totems to populate its own "cabinet of curiosities." We're sensing a theme here; one more curio cabinet and we might have a new trend on our hands.

—LinYee Yuan. Follow her on Twitter at @linyee

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Also on Details.com:
20 Best Home Furnishings from London Design Festival 2013
Got Wood? All-Natural Furniture Is Having a Moment
Real Estate Porn: Enviable Homes in Paris, Anchorage, Geneva, and San Francisco

Photos courtesy of respective brands.
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