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The MSG Debate is Back

The food additive has new legions of fans and phobes alike. But is the controversy really necessary?

Gwyneth Paltrow famously quipped that she'd "rather die than let her kids eat Cup-a-Soup." We're guessing the MSG content was high on her list of offending ingredients. The food additive has sparked controversy among scientists, nutritionists and the general public for years, causing many health-conscious eaters to navigate their way around MSG, while chefs like Momofuku's David Chang favor it—both as modern-day invention and flavor enhancer. As MSG re-enters the cultural conversation, the question remains: To eat it or not?

What It (Really) Is: MSG, a.k.a. monosodium glutamate, is a flavor enhancer. Glutamate exists naturally in certain foods and in the brain, but MSG, which is a sodium ion bonded to glutamate, is not naturally occurring. It's a processed additive, a man-made invention that dates back to 1908 when it was derived from seaweed. Today, it's created from starch or sugar.

How It's Used: While MSG is credited with having an umami taste, it more accurately conveys that taste only when mixed with other savory flavors. On it's own, it doesn't taste great, but combined properly, it can make food taste even better, stimulating your appetite—hence food manufacturers use it to spike soups, salad dressings, sauces, meats and myriad snack foods.

Why It's Controversial: For those sensitive to it, MSG has been associated with headaches, flushing, sweating, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, and other symptoms commonly (and not so cleverly) referred to as "MSG symptom complex." The Food and Drug Administration and The World Health Organization approve its use, but new research continues to call MSG's safety into question. Here, Ryan Andrews, a fitness and nutrition coach with Precision Nutrition, and Haylie Pomroy, nutritionist and creator of The Fast Metabolism Diet, join the debate.

Get the expert opinions on Q.

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Also on Q by Equinox:
Portrait of a Locavore
Awaken Your Morning Juice
Sorghum Is Tastier Than It Sounds

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Also on Details.com:
Phosphates: Worse Than Fat or Sodium?
Do Donuts Make Us Depressed? New Food-Mood Research Says Yes
The New Rules of Eating Raw Food

Image courtesy of Equinox.
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