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The Case For Eating Sardines

With the ascent of food culture and its importance in today's zeitgeist, it's no wonder that "it" ingredients have come to be. Goop recently declared carrots to be having a moment. Turmeric, meanwhile, is virtually ubiquitous. Curious what to order/serve/eat this minute? Joe Isidori, the Michelin rated chef of local and organic-focused Chalk Point Kitchen in NYC, let us in on 5 good-for-you foods to try right now. see more
Health

10 Celebs Who Got Buff For Their Superhero Roles (And How They Did It)

Actor Chris Pratt is only the most recent Hollywood hunk to join a long tradition of handsome stars bulking up to play superheroes on the big screen. For his role in Guardians of the Galaxy, which premieres on Aug. 1, the 6-foot-2-inch actor lost 70 pounds—quite the shift from his last big role in Delivery Man, in which he played a doughy lawyer. Pratt showed off his new, ripped physique in an Instagram selfie, which he called "douchey." But if you ask us, his body transformation—and others like it—is nothing short of awe-inspiring. Herein, a look at flab-to-abs transformations from see more
Health

4 Foods with More Potassium Than a Banana

Cross a finish line this summer and chances are you'll be handed a banana. What gives? In a word: potassium. see more
Sex + Relationships

6 Unspoken Rules of Casual Sex

Casual sex takes many forms. You know the obvious ones: the one-night stand, the booty call, sex by appointment. More recent variations include "rec" (recreational) sex, which exists because, as one friend told me, "every great athlete needs practice." And then there's "cereal" sex, which is a one-night stand amid a dry spell that, like cereal, is satisfying in the moment but leaves you needing further sustenance shortly thereafter. Yet, every flavor of casual sex—uncommitted, unemotional, purely carnal—is governed by the same rules. We list them below to help you fornicate better. see more
Health

How Hot Weather Makes Us Fat

If you live in a place with hot and humid summers where it also happens to rain a lot, here's some bad news: sucky weather correlates with less exercise and thus obesity. At least that's one conclusion from a recent study by researchers from the University of Texas published in the July issue of the American Journal of Public Health. see more
Health

Why Health Doesn't Have To Be Hereditary

In the not-so-distant past, certain factors related to overall health were thought to be uncontrollable. Immune response, longevity, a quick metabolism, and your reaction to stress were hard-wired: out of your hands no matter how much you exercised or how well you ate. Until now. see more
Health

To Pee or Not to Pee: Does Urine Really Ease the Pain of Jellyfish Stings?

The question: I have no plans of peeing on myself anytime soon. But—just in case—will urine kill the pain of a jellyfish sting? see more
Shopping

We Want It: Rapha's Classic Cycling Jersey

The Rapha Club Jersey ($175; rapha.cc) is a staple of the brand's subtle performance collection, redesigned this summer in homage to Italy's premier races, including the 186-mile Milan–San Remo. Made from a wool blend to keep riders comfortable in both cool and warm temperatures, it's just as versatile on this continent, should you want to, say, bike from Manhattan to Montauk and back (nearly the same distance). see more
Health

The MSG Debate is Back

Gwyneth Paltrow famously quipped that she'd "rather die than let her kids eat Cup-a-Soup." We're guessing the MSG content was high on her list of offending ingredients. The food additive has sparked controversy among scientists, nutritionists and the general public for years, causing many health-conscious eaters to navigate their way around MSG, while chefs like Momofuku's David Chang favor it—both as modern-day invention and flavor enhancer. As MSG re-enters the cultural conversation, the question remains: To eat it or not? see more
Health

Good-Looking People Get Sick Less, Study Says

This isn't just another report from the School of Obviousness—it's the result of a decades-long study (published in the Journal of Evolution & Human Behavior that claims that the more attractive a person is, the healthier he or she usually is. see more
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