FRED SAVAGE: I've worked on a few shows that have this "One of the best shows you're not watching" moniker. That's really no consolation. As nice as it is that people are talking about it and remember it, we'd rather be doing the show. "Brilliant but canceled"—we weren't brilliant because we were canceled. We were just a good show. I think there's some idea that being on the air makes your show suck. I disagree. I don't believe that. I would rather be on the air.

ROB THOMAS: I would love the chance to have that six-year NBC prime-time comedy and not have to worry about my children's college fund. It's much easier to do 20 episodes and be great than to do 120. People who can keep up that pace—God, I hope I have a chance to try it someday, but it's intimidating.

•••

Thanks to cancellation, the show's de facto final scene is Henry walking into an audition room—something he never would have considered when Party Down began. It's the perfect launching pad for speculation about the future of the characters . . . and the series.

ROB THOMAS: Ending with Henry in a casting office waiting to audition, we felt like, "Well, if we're gone forever, that's not a bad place to leave it."

DAN ETHERIDGE: What we wanted was just the expression of Henry wanting something again. The journey to a moment where he would try again, that there was a glimmer of forward vector—for us, that was right where we wanted to leave it. I sort of hope, in a way, that the answer of what happened in that room is not as important as the fact that he went into that room.

JOHN ENBOM: I think that was always the big question for who Henry is: What is his definition of a happy ending? Would success as an actor have been a happy ending? Or at the end of the day is he confronting the idea that there's another life out there for him that he needs to accept?

ADAM SCOTT: If Henry did get that part, I would imagine that the result wouldn't be as fantastic as he would expect. But who knows? Maybe it would have been a big success. I know if there was a Season 3, I was only going to be able to do three episodes, so they were going to have to find a way to make that plausible.

KEN MARINO: The victories are small and real. That's what was interesting. Ron falls in love, and at the end there is some hope. If there was another season, I can't imagine that relationship would work out. But you know what's great about John and Dan and Rob and Paul is that they came up with really interesting twists on what you would expect to happen.

PAUL RUDD: One thing's for sure: Kyle would have become a megastar. He would have done everything. And all of it kind of . . . okay.

JOHN ENBOM: No matter how insufferable he can be, he's going to end up landing on his feet somewhere, and it will drive Roman insane.

RYAN HANSEN: I think he probably got a recurring role on a CW show that led to becoming a series regular.

MARTIN STARR: I would have liked to see some growth for Roman. I feel like he would have accidentally ended up as a team leader at some point, using his power to make Kyle feel small every chance he got.

JANE LYNCH: The thing that's important about Constance is she doesn't move. It's in her name. She's been the same exact person from the moment she hit adulthood, and she's in exactly the same place wearing that stupid little jean jacket, riding her bike to each gig, living in some small studio apartment in the Valley, just living in her fantasy. She's happy.

LIZZY CAPLAN: I have my fingers crossed that we get to maybe do some kind of movie or something, so maybe we'll get to see.

ROB THOMAS: We're hoping to do a movie. We're talking about the happy ending for this show.

FRED SAVAGE: I think Rob has to make his Veronica Mars movie first. He's got a few cult followings wandering around.

KEN MARINO: I would be there in a heartbeat. Why—you funding it?


Party Down Season 1 and Season 2 are now available on Amazon.com and on Netflix.

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