1 | THE CLUB
Max's Kansas City, by Steven Kasher (Abrams, $25), captures the legendary venue in all its glamour, not only chronicling the performances of the New York Dolls, Springsteen, and Blondie but also spotlighting attendees like de Kooning and Rauschenberg.

2 | THE LABEL
After introducing the world to reggae in 1959, Chris Blackwell's Jamaican label, Island Records, eventually spanned the globe, signing U2, Roxy Music, and Amy Winehouse. The tale is recounted via photos and critiques in The Story of Island Records (Universe, $40), edited by Chris Salewicz and Suzette Newman.

3 | THE LOOK
Handbills, buttons, and one-sheets are integral to the pop experience, and Mike Evans' (Frances Lincoln, $35) features some of the best, from the mod graphics of Beatlemania to the surreal photomontages by Hipgnosis for Pink Floyd.

4 | THE RECORDS
In Five Hundred 45s (Collins Design, $30), the follow-up to 2002's coffee-table staple 45 RPM, cover designers Spencer Drate and Judith Salavetz present hundreds more nostalgia-inducing sleeves. Elvis, the Stooges, and Superchunk all get their due.

5 | THE SCENE
Jon Savage's England's Dreaming is the U.K.-punk bible. Now, nearly two decades later, devotees can read the full transcripts of his interviews with Johnny Rotten, Joe Strummer, and Chrissie Hynde in The England's Dreaming Tapes (University of Minnesota Press, $26).


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