Like other forms of pornography, revenge porn falls into one of two broad categories: pro and amateur. The professionally produced type usually depicts a guy using a hidden camera to catch his significant other cheating and then exacting revenge by posting the footage online or using it to blackmail the cheater for sex. An entire website, revengeporn.net, is dedicated to the genre; another one, Shoosh Time, a sort of social-networking site heavy on adult content, has material such as a grainy, apparently homemade clip of a woman doing a striptease, with the caption "She loved getting naked for her bf before cheating on him so he decided to send this to us to post!"

Amateur revenge porn, the type that landed Jared Wolny in trouble with the law, is the spontaneous stuff that the professional kind is trying to replicate. Kurtis Potec, 25, director of operations for XTube, one of several porn versions of YouTube, says that when revenge-porn clips are posted to the site—often with the woman's name, phone number, and address—they get a lot of hits.

Potec says he receives two to three revenge-porn complaints a week from both women and men (according to Potec, revenge porn is a growing genre for gay men) who are the subjects of video clips, screen grabs, or cell-phone photos uploaded to XTube. He estimates that the average revenge-porn perpetrator is a 23-to-28-year-old man, though he's seen posts by teenagers and men as old as 50.

The site, which does not prescreen submissions, removes material immediately after a complaint is received, Potec says. "If a posting causes a problem, whether it's child pornography or revenge porn, we clean it up right away," he says.

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But not all revenge porn is uploaded. David Feltmeyer, 34, of Chesterfield, Virginia, pleaded no contest in April 2007 to a misdemeanor charge stemming from his making a DVD of him and his girlfriend having sex. Feltmeyer had originally been charged, the month before, with a felony—distribution of obscene material—after he was accused of placing multiple copies of the DVD, with his ex's name and address, on car windshields in Richmond. After men started showing up on the woman's doorstep, evidently mistaking the DVD for a solicitation, Feltmeyer was contacted by the police, who searched his apartment. Soon after, Feltmeyer turned himself in. But because prosecutors were unable to prove that he'd distributed the DVD—Feltmeyer admitted only to making it and sending a copy to his ex—the felony charge didn't stick, and Feltmeyer received a suspended 90-day sentence and 30 hours of community service. "These were just made-up crimes from Bible Belt tight-asses," Feltmeyer said in a recent phone interview. "It was just a practical joke."

It's safe to say that most victims of revenge porn don't think it's funny, regardless of whether they were complicit in producing the material.