Bike Stands for Design Snobs

Put your two-wheeler on a pedestal with these 10 storage devices that verge on sculpture.

Put your two-wheeler on a pedestal with these
10 storage devices that verge on sculpture.


After noticing that more and more young Japanese cyclists were storing their bikes indoors, the up-and-coming design trio Mile created this striking, nearly 53-pound marble cube with grooves that are custom-cut to fit the size of your tires.
Milestone by Mile for We Love One, $569 for black marble or $610 for white marble;


Fetishists love the way this solid-wood shelf turns their fixie into a piece of wall art, while pragmatists appreciate the way it doubles as a handy surface for stashing books or cycling accessories.
Bike Shelf by Knife & Saw, $270 for ash or $300 for walnut;
The inner lip of this futuristic folded-steel wall rack is lined with a small piece of stitched leather trim, shielding your bike frame from accidental nicks.
Hood by Quarterre, $268;
San Francisco-based GS Cicleria builds custom bikes using vintage lightweight steel frames, and it designed the Velo stand to match; an early edition was cut from reclaimed gymnasium flooring, while new maple models are made to order.
Velo Stand by GS Cicleria, price available upon request;
Now a furniture designer based in Brooklyn, ex-BMX professional Jeff Mayer reconnected with his past to create the Bedford Ave rack, a triangular wedge of veneered birch that's custom-made to fit your frame.
Bedford Ave Bike Rack by 718 Made in Brooklyn, from $350;


The beauty of this simple, rubberized-metal wall hook lies in its near invisibility; it makes any bike up to 40 pounds look like it's floating weightlessly on the wall.
Leonardo Wall Hook by Delta Cycle, $15;
Mies van der Rohe would no doubt approve of this modernist steel cantilever. Covered in the same kind of griptape used on skateboards, the base stabilizes any bike inserted into its tire slot. Plus, its summit doubles as a place to hang your helmet.
Shadow by Quarterre, $634;
Resembling an ordinary plastic bucket at first glance, the Cycloc uses basic physics to mount your bicycle on the wall. Two opposing hooks stabilize the frame in either a horizontal or a vertical position while its weight-distributing cylindrical shape renders it extra-durable.
Cycloc by Andrew Lang, $95;


Meant to look good even when they're empty, these bike racks by the Canadian design duo Cantilever and Press are made from strips of raw, repurposed scrap wood, so the odd nick or burl only adds to their character.
Wall-Mounted Bike Rack by Cantilever and Press, $95;


Four adjustable arms extend from the body of this sustainable-wood leaning rack, offering space to raise two bikes of nearly any dimension up and off the floor.
Branchline by Quarterre, $2,189;
—Monica Khemsurov

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