MODERN BATHROOM ACCESSORIES

Call it the great paradox of home design: Though you and your guests spend plenty of time there with nothing to do but sit and stare, the bathroom is often the most neglected space in the house. Here are a few sights guaranteed to keep people from looking through your medicine chest.

Call it the great paradox of home design: Though you and your guests spend plenty of time there with nothing to do but sit and stare, the bathroom is often the most neglected space in the house. Here are a few sights guaranteed to keep people from looking through your medicine chest. Monica Khemsurov

1. APOTHECARY JARS (pictured above)

$18 to $30 for a pair, dwr.com

These glass jars, useful for holding Q-tips and cotton balls, have all the charm of their antique-store cousins without that 50-year-old mystery gunk inside.

2. BIG DATE MEDICINE CABINET

by Ransmeier Floyd, price upon request, ransmeier-floyd.com

Up-and-coming New York designer Leon Ransmeier affixed a magnifier to the front of the Big Date cabinet so you can spot stray hairs before she does.

3. PAON BATH COLLECTION

by Kazuhiko Tomita for Authentics, $10 to $30, unicahome.com

With its sculpted curves, Kazuhiko Tomita's porcelain bathroom set is typically Japanese. The toothbrush holder, soap dish, and mug all have sturdy, elephant-trunk-inspired handles.

4. BATHROOM SCALE

by Bengt Ek Design, $230, unicahome.com

Designed in Sweden, this scale is more inviting than most—not only because of its bubblelike shape but also because it displays weight in kilograms, so 200 pounds reads as a very svelte 91.

5. MESH BATH MAT

by Habitat, $38, habitat.co.uk

The attribute that makes teak the ideal lumber for outdoor furniture—its weather-resistance—makes it a smart choice for bath mats, too. With this version, by the U.K. company Habitat, you could open your own spa.

Bathroom6

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6. SWISS CROSS SLANT TWEEZERS

by Rubis, $35, dwr.com

If you must endure the pain of plucking that unibrow, do it with stylish tweezers. The Swiss-made Rubis ones, originally designed for watchmakers, have been around since the forties.

Photographs courtesy of dwr.com, ransmeier-floyd.com, unicahome.com, and habitat.co.uk

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