5 Urban Winemakers to Know

Forget bucolic rolling hills—winemaking is coming to the city, as artisanal vintners are setting up shop in old warehouses. Here are five to know.

Photo: Donkey & Goat Winery

Forget bucolic rolling hills—winemaking is coming to the city, as artisanal vintners are setting up shop in old warehouses. Here are five to know.

Cadence | Seattle

Founded by former Boeing engineer Benjamin Smith and his wife, former Microsoft attorney Gaye McNutt, Cadence was one of the pioneers of urban winemaking—and that head start has yielded impressive dividends: the elegant Bordeaux-style blends made in the South Park neighborhood. cadencewinery.com

Donkey Goat | Berkeley, California

Using primarily Rhône varieties and eschewing additives, the husband-and-wife team of Tracey and Jared Brandt—refugees from the tech industry—are crafting some of California's most interesting and distinctive wines in a converted warehouse. adonkeyandgoat.com

Infinite Monkey Theorem | Denver

Working mainly with Colorado-grown grapes—including Malbec, Cabernet Franc, Chardonnay, and Albariño—British expat Ben Parsons makes acclaimed wines that come not only in bottles but also in beer-size aluminum cans. theinfinitemonkeytheorem.com

Laurelhurst Cellars | Seattle

Amateur beer-maker turned vintner Gabe Warner started Laurelhouse in his garage with pals Greg Smallwood and Dave Halbgewachs, who eventually took over the business. Now a duo, they turn out rich, bold reds in a warehouse in Seattle's Georgetown neighborhood. laurelhurstcellars.com

Red Hook Winery | Brooklyn

Set in an old brick waterfront foundry, Red Hook teams New York wine distributor Mark Snyder and prominent California vintners Abe Schoener and Robert Foley. Using Long Island-grown Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Gewrztraminer, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc, they combine Schoener's love of offbeat wines with Foley's penchant for big California reds. redhookwinery.com

—Michael Steinberger

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