Crawfish Étouffée
POCHE'S MARKET, BREAUX BRIDGE, LOUISIANA
You haven't really tasted Cajun country until you've visited this market-cum-restaurant, but you can skip the 50-mile drive from Baton Rouge and navigate the menu online instead. The must-order here is the étouffée—a stew that comes packed with crawfish, butter, and (shhh) cream-of-mushroom soup—but because there's a 10-pound minimum for shipments, you should throw in some boudin, pork sausage crammed with rice and plenty of heat. $23 a quart (2 pounds), shipping included; pochesmarket.com

Cheese Steaks
CAMPO'S DELI, PHILADELPHIA
There are cheese-steak operations that ship pitiful, boil-in-a-bag versions of Philly's famous sandwich. But Campo's Deli, a rickety-table spot on Market Street, gives faraway fans exactly what they want: a yeasty roll stuffed with juicy slices of beef ready to be devoured 20 minutes after arriving on your doorstep. You even get a container of Cheez Whiz—and another of onions in case you want it "wit'." $95 for two, shipping included; camposdeli.com

Mac and Cheese
BEECHER'S HANDMADE CHEESE, SEATTLE
If you like how easy blue-box mac and cheese is to make, you'll relish the just-bake-it simplicity of Beecher's version. The prep is comparable, but the final product is not: The casserole from this artisanal cheese maker incorporates two award-winning lactic gems, which make for a browned crust that screams homemade. $36.95 for a 4.5-lb tray, plus shipping; beechershandmadecheese.com

Downeast Lobster Rolls
HANCOCK GOURMET LOBSTER COMPANY, CUNDY'S HARBOR, MAINE
If you live in the Northeast, getting lobster rolls via next-day delivery is a luxury, but if you live anywhere else, it's a miracle. Instead of wrestling a live crustacean into a pot, you simply butter and skillet-toast top-loading rolls (the traditionalist's choice) and pile on chilled, mayo-glazed chunks of sweet Maine claw and knuckle meat. $55 for 4 rolls, plus delivery; hancockgourmetlobster.com

Green Corn Tamales
EL CHOLO, LOS ANGELES
The thing that fans of this vaunted L.A. Mexican restaurant fixate on—what they talk about in tones that combine nostalgia with a heroin addict's desperation—is the glorious green tamales. The husk-wrapped cakes don't seem big enough to contain the pounds of sweet summer corn (plus cheddar and chiles) that they hold, and you'll have plenty of time to ponder this flavor bounty as you eat your way through a dozen. $42 a dozen, plus shipping; elcholo.com