Keep the supermarket brands for the saucepan—these gourmet oils deserve to be poured directly from the bottle to your plate. Plus, superchef José Andrés shares his recipe for the perfect Spanish mayo.

THE BOTTLES YOU NEED TO OWN

1 | France The Bottle: From the lavender-covered hills of Provence, this Grossanne olive oil from Mas des Bories is sweet and citrusy, like a mouthful of fresh herbs. The Preparation: Finish any summer soup—pea, corn, gazpacho—with a few golden streaks and a judicious squeeze of lemon. $30; murrayscheese.com

2 | Greece
The Bottle: The production of Kokoraki, an unfiltered oil from the Greek island of Zakynthos, is small (handpicked fruit is pressed almost immediately), but the flavor is big and fruity. The Preparation: Grilled white-fleshed fish like a whole branzino or halibut fillets need only a good char, salt, some citrus, and a splash of Kokoraki. $35; zingermans.com

3 | United States
The Bottle: The grassy, unfiltered Katz Chef's Pick Organic is blended from six Italian cultivars grown on 20 acres in Napa Valley. The Preparation: For the perfect sandwich, put a slice of ripe summer tomato on toast, then add a liberal dose of Katz's oil and coarse salt. $26; katzandco.com

4 | Spain
The Bottle: Morisca and Hojiblanca olives, among other Spanish varieties, team up in the elegant Marqués de Valdueza oil—the finish is smooth and slightly fruity. The Preparation: Scallops and sushi-grade tuna or salmon require only a gentle squeeze of citrus and plenty of this stuff. $30; tienda.com

5 | Italy
The Bottle: Castello di Volpaia is a blend of unpressed Tuscan olives, resulting in a ripe, fruity flavor and a mildly spicy accent. The Preparation: Grilled meats—like a porterhouse, served rare with a little fresh rosemary (an old Tuscan touch)—are even better with a generous drizzle of Volpaia. $28; markethallfoods.com

GET THE PERFECT POURER

1. Scientific
This borosilicate-glass bottle has a rubber-topped vial for drizzling, recalling a pipette, the classic chemistry-lab instrument. Pipette oil-and-vinegar set, $59; designhousestockholmusa.com

2. Psychedelic
Leave it to the irreverent Dutch firm Droog to make a bong-shaped Pyrex decanter, with nozzles for oil and vinegar. Salad Sunrise pourer, $46; greenergrassdesign.com

3. Elegant
Suspending the good stuff in midair, this handblown cruet is made by the high-end Italian glass company Ichendorf. Double-walled oil-and-vinegar carafe, $22; aplusrstore.com

THE ONLY WAY TO IMPROVE UPON A FINE OIL


Spanish-Style Mayo (Serves 4)
Spanish superchef José Andrés, of Jaleo at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, shares his recipe for allioli (aioli in Italian), the mayolike condiment that showcases the flavor of a great olive oil.

Chef José Andrés' allioli on his Patatas Bravas dish.

1 ¼ cups olive oil
1 egg
2 tbsp water
1 tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
½ tsp kosher salt
4 garlic cloves, peeled

In a blender, combine ½ cup of oil with egg, water, lemon juice, salt, and garlic. Blend until just combined, then, with the motor running, add remaining oil in a steady stream until mixture is creamy and thick, about 2 minutes. Blend in a little more water if allioli is too thick. Season to taste.

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