1.
When I moved to New York, Iíd see Wall Street guys who wear beautiful suits all week and then decide, Iím gonna be that all-black guy—just on weekends. I went through this moment where I thought, Okay, I need ďgoing-outĒ clothes. But that doesnít work.

2.
If you invite someone into your home, itís your job to make them feel welcome. They can burn your house down, and itís your job to not make a big deal out of it. I really believe that.

3.
Unless youíre playing the piano at a bar, you donít wear black tie every night. It pops up and itís like, Oh, what do I do? But you can break up black tie now—wear the jacket with a pair of chinos or wear the pants with a T-shirt in the summer. Then itís not a leap at all.

4.
Men fall into patterns with their clothes. If they got the date they wanted to get wearing something, they donít deviate much from that. Weíre all a little Pavlovian that way.

5.
Kanye West does his own thing. What I love the most about his style is that he wears every designer in the world, but you donít see the designer—you just see him.

6.
I was at Bergdorf Goodman for five years, and I really paid attention to how guys shop. I respect the drama inherent in shopping and get why guys might be afraid of that.

7.
Iíve got this enormous Landís End rolling nylon duffel. And I know exactly how much can go in it. The only thing that throws me is how to pack my Dopp kit.

8.
If guys step back and are just honest about what they think looks good on them, itís really hard to lose. You can spot guys who take on personas that are not theirs.

9.
A friend of mine who grew up in Italy once explained to me that while little boys in America go to the park with their dads on the weekends, little boys in Italy go to the tailor with their fathers. So from a very early age itís normal for Italian men to pay attention to clothes.

10.
There are fewer and fewer guys who have to wear a suit to work. So thereís this weird thing happening where the cool guy actually wants to wear a suit, and he doesnít have to. The suit becomes a choice, not a gun held to your head.